Translation of the Greenpeace article on Phthalates in sex toys - SexToyer.com

Translation of the Greenpeace article on Phthalates in sex toys – BBFactory


A new report released today by our Dutch offices indicates that the plastics used to create certain sex toys contain very high concentrations of dangerous phlalates, toxic chemical plasticizers used with PVC to make it soft and flexible.

Greenpeace Netherlands asked research firm TNO to examine eight different sex toys, including dildos and vibrators, for phthalates. Seven out of eight contained phthalates in concentrations ranging from 24 to 51 percent. These are non-biodegradable chemicals and can be toxic even in small doses.

The research was commissioned after a survey conducted by Durex in 2005 indicating that three million Dutch people admitted to owning a sex toy. More than one million sex toys are sold each year, representing a market of 22 million euros.

Greenpeace has opposed the use of phthalates for more than three years, research on children’s toys has shown that the chemicals can be ingested through direct exposure to sensitive tissues, such as those inside the mouth. In 2005 the EU banned the use of DEHP phthalates in children’s toys because of its harmful effect on young children, forcing toy manufacturers to develop alternatives. It is therefore strange to always see them used in sex toys, also made for internal use.

According to activist Bart van Opzeeland “it is incredible that this substance can still be used in toys for adults. In previous years we tested many products but we never found such concentrations”.

Unfortunately, phthalates can still be found in a wide range of products from cosmetics to floor coverings.
The latest research indicates that exposure to these substances can impair the body’s ability to regulate its hormone production, interfere with reproduction, lead to liver and kidney disorders. They could also, to a lesser extent, cause cancer.

So what is the solution ?

The “legislation is obviously insufficient in this matter”, says Van Opzeeland. “It is time for legislation to ban this kind of dangerous substance. This is the only way to stop the pollution. The truth is that effective alternatives already exist. It is perfectly reasonable to require a law that ensures this:

  • Substances should be placed on the market only once their safety has been proven.
  • Information on all chemicals and products should be publicly available.

Greenpeace continues to demand that the EU adopt the proposals for a strict chemicals law. If passed, it would ban the production and use of toxic substances, forcing industry to use non-hazardous alternatives.

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